Guild Statement on Protests

June 2020 By the Northwest Editors Guild Board of Directors Black lives matter. The board of the Northwest Editors Guild mourns the violent murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and so many others—including, here in the Northwest, Manuel Ellis. We are appalled at the violence committed by those entrusted with law enforcement. Yet as representatives of an overwhelmingly White professional association, we must also recognize the racial inequality in our own organization and in our profession. In her classic book Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? Beverly Tatum, PhD, writes of racism as a moving walkway. “Active racist behavior is equivalent to walking fast on the conveyor belt,” she writes. “Passive racist behavior is equivalent to standing still on [it].” Unless an individual or an organization makes an effort to walk in the opposite direction—to intentionally and repeatedly take anti-racist actions—they are carried along with everyone else.   In recent years, the Northwest Editors Guild has recognized this phenomenon and taken preliminary steps toward walking in the opposite direction. We’ve included goals to increase diversity (in both membership and leadership) in our strategic plan, and we recently launched the second year of a writer mentorship program designed to provide paid publishing opportunities to Black and other underrepresented voices. Of course, this is not enough. Diversifying a profession mocked by the hashtag #publishingsowhite will not happen overnight. Nor will we immediately diversify the many other fields in which our members work. If we are to truly stand with this movement for social justice, we must exercise the profound empathy and discernment that are hallmarks of our profession and take actions every day, every week, and every year to not just walk against the people mover but help grind it to a halt.  We stand with the protests against racism and violent policing, and we promise to continue working toward a just and equitable society that honors and values Black lives. We encourage Seattle-area members (if they are able) to join the silent march on Friday, June 12, a day on which Black Lives Matter Seattle–King County has called for a statewide general strike, and we encourage members everywhere to participate in local actions and/or contribute to anti-racist movements and programs in other ways.  We also invite members to join a conversation on the Northwest Editors Guild listserv (with the tag “OT/BLM” in the subject line), sharing feelings, ideas, and experiences during this momentous and challenging time. Northwest Editors Guild Board of DirectorsErin Cusick, PresidentAlicia Ramos, Vice President of Board DevelopmentMariLou Harveland, Vice President of Member ServicesJesi Vega, SecretaryMichael Schuler, TreasurerAlison Cantrell, Volunteer Coordinator, Member at LargeBrendan McLaughlin, Chair of the Communications Committee, Member at LargeKris Ashley, Member at LargeLaura Shaw, Member at LargeLaura Whittemore, Chair of the Outreach Committee, Member at LargeMatt Bennett, Coordinator of the Writer Mentorship Program, Member at Large

Welcoming 2020 on the Board

February 2020 On January 19, departing, returning, and incoming board members of the Northwest Editors Guild joined together for our annual daylong retreat to meet up in person, share information, and ensure a smooth transition into 2020. Six volunteers (Elaine Duncan, Valerie Paquin, Jessyca Yoppolo, Karen Parkin, Betsy Berger, and Sue Cook) left the board after completing their years of service, and four new board volunteers (Laura Whittemore, Jesi Vega, Kris Ashley, and Brendan McLaughlin) joined volunteers who continue their service from last year to form the 2020 board. Please join us in welcoming our new members, and enjoy these brief introductions to the whole board. Executive Committee Erin Cusick, President I am an independent copyeditor and proofreader specializing in literary fiction and cookbooks for traditional publishers, small presses, and independent authors. I completed formal training through UC Berkeley’s rigorous Professional Sequence in Editing, and I frequently participate in continuing education opportunities to enhance and expand my skill set. In my work, I focus on enhancing reader engagement and comprehension and providing authors with potential solutions to address continuity concerns and prevent reader distraction. From the first Northwest Editors Guild event I attended in 2013, I’ve found the group to comprise some of the most welcoming, generous people I’ve ever known. The Guild has been integral to my professional development, and I’m delighted for this opportunity to serve on the board. In my free time, I enjoy swimming laps, running, cooking and baking, traveling, learning to play the piano, and, of course, reading. Michael Schuler, Treasurer I have always loved good writing and helping to make writing better. My freelance work, which consists of copyediting and proofreading, focuses primarily on fiction and academic writing. I am also the publishing and marketing coordinator for ARCADE, a local architecture and design nonprofit. After receiving degrees in architecture and urban planning, I worked in local government and as a consultant for many years before completing the University of Washington Certificate in Editing program in 2014. Any free time I corner is quickly sacrificed to my hobbies, which include programming (Word macros of late), film, photography, and cooking. Alicia Ramos, Vice President of Board Development I’ve always been an editor in one fashion or another. My love of reading led me to an undergraduate degree in literature. I started my professional career practicing law, spent more years than I like to count in corporate communications, and finally made the switch to full-time editing in late 2016 when I joined ECG Management Consultants. I’ve been a Guild member since 2015. My freelance work, which includes everything from proofreading to substantive editing (but not full developmental editing), is focused on popular fiction (particularly queer romance) and memoir. I love working with authors to help them convey their ideas in the most effective way. Nothing makes me happier than hearing that I’ve delivered what the author needed in a way that pleased them and helped them grow. (Okay, maybe kittens make me happier. Kittens are hard to …

Red Pencil Conference 2019: June Conference News

June 19, 2019 Contributed by the 2019 Red Pencil conference committee Have you noticed we’re excited about what’s coming this September? The Northwest Editors Guild’s Red Pencil Conference 2019: Voice & Voices is getting closer and closer, and we hope you’re excited too. Registration is open now, and you’ll get the best price if you register before July 31 at the early bird rates. If you’re still on the fence, here are a few reasons you might want to join us: to catch up with old and new friends to feast on the food at Bastyr (No, really! It’s delicious!) to expand your imagination by learning about types of editing you may never have touched before to deepen your practice by exploring a variety of ways editors think about voice and voices to join in the choir of voices that make up this magnificent community of Pacific Northwest editors Read on to learn about a few of the many inspiring sessions you’ll have to choose from. And consider how you might contribute, too. First Peek at Presenters and Sessions How Many Words in a Picture? Editing Graphic Novels Christina Frey joins us from Baltimore, where she is a developmental/line editor as well as co-executive of the Editorial Freelancers Association. Christina is also a traditionally published graphic novelist who knows that, in some cases, words alone don’t tell the story. In her session, she will demonstrate the graphic novel writing process from start to finish—from characters and plot to art and script—and discuss where editors and proofreaders fit in this industry. Technical Editing for Science and Engineering: The Art of Translating Technical Topics into Clear Language Thanks go to Northwest Editors Guild member Mike Maisen for organizing this panel of in-house and freelance technical editors, who will talk about how they approach the work of making science writing easy to navigate and digest for a variety of audiences. In this session, you’ll hear about the panelists’ day-to-day work at science-focused consulting firms and have the opportunity to ask questions about skills and careers in technical editing. Jennifer Koogler, Guild member, technical editor, and proposal writer at Aspect Consulting, will moderate, with panelists Hannah Garrison, technical editor at Anchor QEA; Kristen Legg, managing technical editor at Floyd|Snider; and Marcy McAuliffe, owner and editor at McAuliffe Technical Editing Services. Tweet This, Not That: How to Write and Edit for Social Media Alysha Love is a multiplatform editor at the Idaho Statesman in Boise and on the executive board of ACES: The Society for Editing. Her session will discuss crafting multiple voices to meet many audiences, because what works on one social media platform might not work on another. You’ll learn how various types of social media work, how to most effectively engage audiences, and how to adapt tone and language for each platform to meet what different audiences are looking for. Many Authors, Unified Voices Olympia, Washington, editor Laura Cameron works in-house at the Washington State Auditor’s Office, where her role ranges from …

Giant Pencil Interviews Mary Norris, the Comma Queen

April 2019 Our own mascot, Giant Pencil, met up with author and copy editor extraordinaire Mary Norris at the ACES 2019 conference in Providence, RI, to chat about her latest book, Greek to Me. Giant Pencil: You’ve spoken lovingly about your favorite pencils in numerous past interviews, but have you ever been interviewed by an actual pencil? Mary Norris: This is the first time I have been interviewed directly by a pencil, but I have shot a video in a pencil boutique and had its owner, Caroline Weaver, splay an array of gorgeous pencils in her well-manicured hands for my admiration. If you don’t know C.W. Pencil Enterprise, you’re in for a treat. GP: In Greek to Me, you discuss how learning Greek and traveling to Greece helped sharpen your English knowledge. What is one useful Greek word or phrase (ancient or modern) that all editors should know? MN: The Greek for “O.K.” is entáxei (εντάξει), pronounced “enDOXy” (rhymes with “epoxy,” if I am pronouncing that right). The literal meaning is “in order”: the prefix for “in” is en (εν) and taxei (τάξει) is a form of the noun that means (among other things) class, as in classroom at school, where everyone sits in order and things are under control (supposedly). We cannot do without “O.K.” in English. In Greek, it’s a very reassuring word. GP: What other fine points do you think the editorial types will enjoy most about your new book? MN: Writers and editors and all word nerds enjoy the alphabet, and I have a chapter at the beginning of the book in which I did my best to write something interesting about it. It’s about the Greek alphabet as the ancestral alphabet of English. I started out writing an abcedarian for the barbarian (Alpha is for Athena, Beta is for Bios, etc.), but it kept putting me to sleep, so I jumped all the way to chi and omega and had fun with fraternity names, Sigma Tau Delta (STD), of which I am an honorary member. I think people who like words will enjoy the prospect of a new alphabet. GP: Erasing the thought that editing—as we know it today—didn’t really exist in ancient times, how do you think you would have fared as an editor of ancient Greek epigraphs? You’ve edited many famous authors in The New Yorker, but how would you have marked up, say, an early written version of the Iliad? MN: It’s a little hard to edit something that is written in stone. If it has a mistake, do you fix it or preserve it? I wouldn’t want to draw attention to it . . . I think I’d be paralyzed by the idea of editing epigraphs. The epic poems are more forgiving. Once they were written down, some of the repetition in them was no longer necessary, but it is part of their fabric, and if I changed anything, I would immediately change it back. I hope. GP: What was it like …

Pleased to Meet You

February 1, 2019 The enthusiastic volunteers who guide the Northwest Editors Guild kicked off the year with a daylong board of directors’ retreat on January 13. To ensure a smooth transition, departing, returning, and incoming board members, along with Guild administrator Jen Grogan, joined together at this annual event. Four volunteers—Christina Johnson, Roberta Klarreich, Pm Weizenbaum, and Polly Zetterberg—wrapped up two years of service, making way for new board members: Alison Cantrell, Erin Cusick, MariLou Harveland, and Alicia Ramos. The team is looking forward to meeting up with members at our bimonthly member meetings, regional gatherings, and, of course, the September 21 Red Pencil conference. Until then, here are brief introductions. Executive Committee Elaine Duncan, President After practicing law in California for almost thirty years, I retired and moved to Seattle in 2012. Having always loved the process of writing and editing, I joined the Guild, enrolled in the University of Washington editing program, and started freelancing. I enjoy editing any kind of nonfiction—even arcane technical topics like economics or law—but I hope to branch out in the next few years. Joining the Guild and then serving on its board have been instrumental in helping me feel grounded in Seattle without the backstop of coworkers. I love contributing to this organization and meeting people who enjoy it as well. Aside from editing, I like walking around Cougar Mountain with my dog, Anya, visiting Washington wineries, and trying to be a tourist in Seattle. MariLou Harveland, Vice President of Member Services My editing journey began in 2001, editing technical training manuals for the Microsoft Learning Team, where I also acted as contributing writer and editor for their in-house style guide and trainer for new MS writers in the U.S. and in Denmark. In 2012, I entered the freelance world after publishing my first work of fiction, The Seventh Soul, which won first place in the Indie Reader Discovery Awards—Paranormal category at the International Book Expo in New York, NY. As a freelancer, I mostly focus on developmental, substantive, and copyediting for novels (fiction and nonfiction) and technical content. I have a master’s degree in English from North Dakota State University, where I taught College Composition I & II. Currently, I am balancing writing and editing with spending quality time with my husband, Dan, and our vivacious golden retriever and bossy cat. Alicia Ramos, Vice President of Board Development I’ve always been an editor in one fashion or another. My love of reading led me to an undergraduate degree in literature. I started my professional career practicing law, spent more years than I like to count in corporate communications, and finally made the switch to full-time editing in late 2016 when I joined ECG Management Consultants. I’ve been a Guild member since 2015. My freelance work, which includes everything from proofreading to substantive editing (but not full developmental editing), is focused on popular fiction (particularly queer romance) and memoir. I love working with authors to help them convey their ideas in the most effective …

Collaboration and Relaxation at the Oregon and SW Washington Editors Retreat

January 2019 By Alison Cantrell We met . . . In early 2018, fellow Portland editor and Guild member Julie Swearingen and I took over planning of the happy hours for the Portland contingent of the Northwest Editors Guild, hoping to bring our local editors together and continue to provide them with a space for communication and collaboration. We’ve enjoyed the relationships and connections this experience has forged for us. When a conversation with former Guild president Pm Weizenbaum sparked the idea for an editors retreat, we were eager to help create a learning-based experience that would build upon the happy hours we’d started hosting. So, during the last weekend of September 2018, twelve editors gathered in small Rockaway Beach, Oregon, for the first ever Oregon and SW Washington Editors Retreat. Over six months in the making, this retreat was a chance to take part in professional development in the off year of Red Pencil while giving area editors the opportunity to relax in a beautiful local setting. We collaborated . . . Highlights of the retreat were the lively discussions we held around various editing topics. Julie Swearingen kicked off our Saturday morning by leading a talk on how marketing factors into editing, reminding editors that they don’t edit in a vacuum and to stay abreast of how their authors will be marketing their books to publishers and readers alike. In my day job, I do a lot of editing for social media, so I volunteered to lead the group in discussing what makes editing social media different from other types of copy as well as strategies and tips for editing good social content. Together, we explored how to optimize copy based on its audience and platform as well as how to ensure copy is crafted in the best way to make it visible to and searchable for social media users, including effective use of hashtags. Eugene-area editor Sherri Schultz discussed the phenomena of editors moving from large metro areas to smaller, less expensive but still culturally vibrant towns, and taking their editing work with them and the potential benefits of a location-independent lifestyle. We rounded out our day with a discussion period dedicated to planning future Guild events in Oregon and SW Washington. Retreaters enthusiastically suggested new formats for events, in addition to novel topics area editors would like to learn more about. We’re hoping to see some of these ideas implemented in the coming year. We relaxed . . . In between stimulating editing talk, we took breaks, exploring the nearby town and coastline. We were staying just a short walk from the beach, so editors took various trips down to stroll alongside the waves. Some of us also visited the local shops and brought back goodies, including locally made taffy. The group also had time to bond over a movie night, where we chose to settle in with a lighthearted editing-related film and have a few laughs, as well as a blind date book swap activity. …

2018 State of the Guild

December 2018 By Pm Weizenbaum Note: Pm delivered this message at our annual potluck on October 7. Her term as board president ends on December 31, 2018. Hello! My name is Pm Weizenbaum, and I’m president of the Northwest Editors Guild. Thank you all for coming and for contributing to this year’s potluck, our eighteenth (although we’re now twenty-one years old, so drink up). It’s great to see so many familiar and new faces here. I joined the Editors Guild about seven years ago, to get the member discount on Red Pencil 2011. When I was a new member—didn’t know anyone, feeling shy and unconfident—I used to experience the Guild as a sort of theatrical troupe, with member meetings as the bimonthly performances, and the Red Pencil conference as the star-studded gala event. By joining the board, I got to step behind the curtain and learn about all the backstage activity that goes on in support of our members. One of the very first things I learned about the board was that each one of these people takes our mission to heart, weighing decisions against these words: “The Northwest Editors Guild connects writers with professional editors of the written word in the Pacific Northwest. We also foster community among our members and provide resources for their career development.” As president for this year, I’ve had the privilege of being “guest director” for eleven bright, engaged, and funny board members. In place of set design, lighting, and costume staff, much of our work is done in committees: Operations, Board Development, Programming, Communications, with the Executive committee providing a supporting role overall. And as a group, the board votes on larger decisions affecting the membership, as well as putting on our potluck and other special events. Keep in mind that the board consists of volunteers—working editors who are busy building businesses, or working full time in-house, and sometimes even both—while I show you what our repertory theater has provided to our audience of 375-odd Guild members, as well as prospective members, clients, and even the broader national editorial community in our 2018 season. I’ll describe highlights of what each of these committees has accomplished this year. First, the Operations committee. It handles the internal nuts and bolts. Talk to our dedicated administrator Jen Grogan about these unsung essentials. Most visible to you was moving our email list from an increasingly obstinate Yahoo to Google Groups. This committee includes our treasurer, who this year has helped the board develop a more strategic budgeting process, and craft banking and investment policies regarding Guild assets. —Curious? Talk to Michael Schuler. And the Board Development committee: In another behind-the-scenes role, this committee of one keeps the rest of us happy in our roles and ensures that the board is well supplied with future board candidates. —Talk to Valerie Paquin if you’d like to hear more. Here, some Programming committee highlights: In addition to fine member meeting topics that the Programming committee presents, of which you’re all …

Unique Holiday Gifts for Editors

NOVEMBER 2018 By Jill Walters   What kind of holiday gifts would a discerning editor enjoy? How about the editor who seems rigid but has a secret sense of humor? The basic go-to coffee shop gift cards and sets of red pens are appreciated, but you can do better than that for your closest edibuddies and word nerds. Below is a list of unique and memorable gifts—arranged alphabetically by store name—suitable for just about every age, size, flavor, and type of editor, plus the tiniest editors-to-be. You might even find something you’ll want to treat yourself to after making that big deadline! Based on suggestions from fellow editors and plenty of searching, these affordable gifts all cost less than $50, and many register under the $25 mark. Most shops listed are owned by editors or wordy types, or are small businesses based in the Pacific Northwest and the western U.S. and Canada. (More small print at the end of the post.) Sorry, bibliophiles, but there are no books included because there could easily be a dozen lists of books alone. This guide is full of clothing, accessories, office supplies, housewares, beverages, and generally fun things any word wizard would want. 1. AP vs. Chicago and Conscious Style Guide (aka Quiet Press) Shops California editing superstar Karen Yin, the founder of the AP vs. Chicago and Conscious Style Guide websites (and 2017 Red Pencil Conference keynote speaker), makes it easy to show your love of editing and respectful language with merch from her two shops. Please note: Order T-shirts from the Uni-T shop which has a wider selection and custom color choices not available on Karen’s Etsy shop. And as an extra-special bonus, Karen is offering a 10% discount for blog readers through December 31, 2018, at both her shops with the discount code REDPEN. Top Picks: Edit or Die Mug ($12) A roomy 15-ounce mug perfect for imbibing while marking Oxford commas. Make Peace With Words T-shirt ($34) Wear your support for conscious and inclusive language choices with these incredibly comfy bamboo/organic cotton blend tees. Available in fitted or straight-cut styles with plenty of color choices for shirts and inks to customize your look. 2. Arrant Pedantry Shop Utah editor Jonathon Owen has been writing about language usage and change for more than a decade on his Arrant Pedantry blog. The store connected to his blog features witty T-shirts in many sizes and styles that will make any grammarian chuckle. Top Picks: Stet Wars: The Editor Strikes Back T-shirt ($14.99–$20.99 depending on style) One of several hilarious Sci-Fi/word nerd mashup tees available at this shop. I Could Care Fewer T-shirt ($14.99–$20.99 depending on style) Make the pedants cringe and the descriptivists cheer with this grammatical shirt. 3. Blackwing The Blackwing 602 is one of the most famous pencils in history due to its impeccable quality and soft lead. Super-editor Mary Norris of The New Yorker even raved about Blackwing pencils in her book and in videos. Beyond the classic Blackwing 602, there are now several custom …

A Dev Editing Handbook with Novelistic Empathy

OCTOBER 2018 By Matthew Bennett In anticipation of our upcoming November 12 member meeting on developmental editing, let’s review a book that’s an inspiring and comprehensive introduction to the craft of “dev editing,” my own preferred corner of the craft. Imagine for a moment you’re an editor in a publishing house, perhaps one of the local presses like Wave Books in Seattle. As you sip your morning coffee, two of your colleagues (frazzled editors in their own right) collide in the hall and mix up their manuscripts. One of these manuscripts is a sly and meticulous instruction manual on the craft of developmental editing. The other is a novel about books, a story driven by conflict and (sometimes) resolution between editors, writers, and publishers. To aid your colleagues, you accidentally shuffle several chapters of each book into the other like a poker dealer with a stack of cards. One would expect the new hybrid manuscript to bewilder the narrative, but the shuffled whole catalyzes so harmoniously that the publisher rejoices in the happy accident. This resulting book is Scott Norton’s Developmental Editing: A Handbook for Freelancers, Authors, and Publishers (Chicago, 2009). Norton divides his guide into ten chapters, each describing developmental editing processes and tools, on the one hand, and a fictionalized editing project, on the other. These fictional sections address several aspects of developmental editing by dramatizing a problematic writer-editor relationship, such as an uncompromising writer with a manuscript lacking a concept. To teach the interested writer or editor, Norton creates problems in the novelistic sections that he resolves in the guidance sections. Norton begins with the foundation of any successful editing relationship: to “engage in sustained acts of two-way empathy—toward … authors and their prospective readers.” For the writer, the craft of fiction demands a keenly developed empathetic imagination. For the dev editor as well, robust empathy is necessary for both the writer and their potential audience. Combining his own empathy with a mania for outlining, Norton humorously delivers his lessons for improving troubled manuscripts while encouraging an amicable working relationship between writer and editor. There is a wide variety of editing techniques in Developmental Editing, as well as endearing character studies and even views on the publishing industry, but for the sake of brevity I’ll focus on only one section as exemplary of the whole. In chapter two of Developmental Editing we encounter the zombie manuscript: a shambling text that resembles a book and yet has no soul. Here Norton discusses the problem of a manuscript lacking a core concept, and he plops this text down between a first-time author, a New York trade publisher, and a freelance editor. For Norton, a subject is simply a topic that guides a particular discussion, while a concept is something larger, what we might refer to as a position or “an author’s special take on a subject.” Here is Norton’s editing process in a nutshell: interview the writer, read the manuscript deeply (twice is best!), take notes, categorize subjects, synthesize …

Say Hello to Your 2018 Northwest Editors Guild Board

September 2018 Here’s a friendly introduction to the twelve-person all-volunteer board of directors who serve two-year terms and work on committees that support the Guild’s mission: connecting clients with professional editors, fostering community among our members, and providing resources for their career development. In January 2018, our diverse team got right down to business in a spirit of creative collaboration. This year we’ve focused on both accomplishing tasks that have lingered on the board’s to-do list for years—such as officially dropping “independent” from our name—and strategizing how we can best serve the Guild membership in the future: for example, with the help of member and nonprofit consultant Dawn Bass, we’re writing the organization’s first business plan. We’d like to tell you more about what else we’ve been up to—and we want to hear about you! All Guild members are welcome to come and eat, chat, relax, and hear a brief “State of the Guild” recap at the annual board-sponsored potluck on Sunday, October 7, 3:30-6:30 p.m., Lakewood Seward Park Community Club in Seattle. Until then, here’s a little bit more about each one of us: Officers/Executive Committee President: Pm Weizenbaum (Chair, Communications and Outreach committees) I’ve been a content editor in the business and nonprofit sectors for 40 years (Microsoft, MIT, Amazon, Gates Foundation, many others). I am expert in translating tech-speak into language that readers can easily act on. I’ve recently branched out to editing fiction as well. My philosophy is: You mean everything you say—I help you say exactly what you mean. With the Editors Guild, I’ve enjoyed helping to plan Red Pencil 2015 and 2017. Also important to me are my big red poodle and art quilting. Vice President of Board Development: Valerie Paquin (Programming and Renaming committees) I’m a freelance copyeditor and proofreader focusing on nonprofit and corporate communications, specialty nonfiction, and fiction. I have subject matter fluency in woodworking and furniture making, home improvement, vegan and gluten-free cooking, sewing and crafts, basic paleontology and geology, animal welfare, and conservation. In addition to editing and proofreading, I have extensive experience managing a variety of projects, from engineering catalogs and apple juice ads to custom furniture builds and fundraising auctions. I have a BA in Business Administration and a Certificate in Editing, both from the University of Washington, and an AAS in Furniture Design and Manufacturing. Vice President of Member Services: Matt Bennett (Chair, Programming committee) I began editing in 2008 at Ronsdale Press, where I shepherded documents from submission to final print and served as editor for publications such as Sheila James’s In the Wake of Loss (2009). I later acted as a freelance copyeditor for academic monographs, such as Nicholas Hudson’s A Political Biography of Samuel Johnson (Pickering & Chatto, 2013). My recent editing work is largely developmental and includes novels and short stories, master’s theses and doctoral dissertations. I have an English PhD from the University of British Columbia and have been writing, editing, and publishing academic, journalistic, and fictional prose for over a decade. Treasurer: Michael …