Playing the Rates Game & Negotiating the Fair Win

Playing the Rates Game & Negotiating the Fair Win Presenters Erin Bass: PSU publishing program studentEsa Grigsby: PSU publishing program studentTed Leonhardt: Negotiation expert and advisor to creatives Video Coming Soon Announcement About Rates Discussion In order to steer clear of any potential for liability in presenting or discussing rates, the Guild recommends that any reviewer, presenter, or member adhere to the following guidelines: Do not suggest or encourage the adoption of any particular rate or rate structure in a way that would make the member rates more uniform than they otherwise would have been. Any data exchange or statistical reporting that includes current prices, or information that identifies data from individual competitors, can raise antitrust concerns if it encourages more uniform prices than otherwise would exist. In general, information reporting cost or data other than price, and historical data rather than current or future data, is less likely to raise antitrust concerns. Members may share or discuss their typical individual rates or rate structures with other members consistent with the above guidelines. ERIN BASS AND ESA GRIGSBY: PSU NWEG Editorial Rates Analysis (pdf on Google Drive)2018 Industry Report: Northwest Editors Guild (pdf on Google Drive) We looked at the 2018 rate survey conducted by the NW Editors Guild. We developed a research question: Is experience a factor in how much an editor gets paid for their work, and how does that change based on whether they are freelance or work in-house? We focused most of our attention on the relevant data sets (rather than trying to take on all of the fantastically dense information the Guild did such a great job gathering). When we looked at that data, we also looked at the differences between freelance and in-house editorial rates to see what kinds of insight could be provided there. We had more information for freelancers than in-house editors because there was a higher number of freelance responders, which is important to take into account when looking at the data as well. Overall, in-house editors reported a higher correlation between experience and rate, but it still wasn’t a significant correlation. We tracked rates through seven different editing types: content, copy, developmental, web and blog, proofreading, substantive, and technical. After analyzing the data, we came to the conclusion that there is no correlation between rates and experience for most editors right now. In-house editors are more likely to report some correlation, but the correlation is still lower than other industries where, in general, the longer you work, the more you get paid. Possible reasons for the difference in correlation for in-house editors: Perhaps because freelancing takes a certain amount of social capital and networking Generally there’s a more structured nature of the experience/raise correlation in most business organizations There isn’t really a true, consistent correlation between experience and pay rate for editors. However, there is a small pattern which suggests experience is more likely to affect rates if the editor is in-house rather than freelance. Content editing and copyediting are similar in that both reflect higher experience levels having high rates. Freelance substantive editing rates …

Giant Pencil Interviews Mary Norris, the Comma Queen

April 2019 Our own mascot, Giant Pencil, met up with author and copy editor extraordinaire Mary Norris at the ACES 2019 conference in Providence, RI, to chat about her latest book, Greek to Me. Giant Pencil: You’ve spoken lovingly about your favorite pencils in numerous past interviews, but have you ever been interviewed by an actual pencil? Mary Norris: This is the first time I have been interviewed directly by a pencil, but I have shot a video in a pencil boutique and had its owner, Caroline Weaver, splay an array of gorgeous pencils in her well-manicured hands for my admiration. If you don’t know C.W. Pencil Enterprise, you’re in for a treat. GP: In Greek to Me, you discuss how learning Greek and traveling to Greece helped sharpen your English knowledge. What is one useful Greek word or phrase (ancient or modern) that all editors should know? MN: The Greek for “O.K.” is entáxei (εντάξει), pronounced “enDOXy” (rhymes with “epoxy,” if I am pronouncing that right). The literal meaning is “in order”: the prefix for “in” is en (εν) and taxei (τάξει) is a form of the noun that means (among other things) class, as in classroom at school, where everyone sits in order and things are under control (supposedly). We cannot do without “O.K.” in English. In Greek, it’s a very reassuring word. GP: What other fine points do you think the editorial types will enjoy most about your new book? MN: Writers and editors and all word nerds enjoy the alphabet, and I have a chapter at the beginning of the book in which I did my best to write something interesting about it. It’s about the Greek alphabet as the ancestral alphabet of English. I started out writing an abcedarian for the barbarian (Alpha is for Athena, Beta is for Bios, etc.), but it kept putting me to sleep, so I jumped all the way to chi and omega and had fun with fraternity names, Sigma Tau Delta (STD), of which I am an honorary member. I think people who like words will enjoy the prospect of a new alphabet. GP: Erasing the thought that editing—as we know it today—didn’t really exist in ancient times, how do you think you would have fared as an editor of ancient Greek epigraphs? You’ve edited many famous authors in The New Yorker, but how would you have marked up, say, an early written version of the Iliad? MN: It’s a little hard to edit something that is written in stone. If it has a mistake, do you fix it or preserve it? I wouldn’t want to draw attention to it . . . I think I’d be paralyzed by the idea of editing epigraphs. The epic poems are more forgiving. Once they were written down, some of the repetition in them was no longer necessary, but it is part of their fabric, and if I changed anything, I would immediately change it back. I hope. GP: What was it like …

Typography in the 21st Century

Typography in the 21st Century Editor and typographer John D. Berry has done extensive research on the overlap, and will explain how we can make differentiations that are useful and appropriate for 21st-century publishing. Typography for Editors PDF Unfortunately there were some unforeseen technical difficulties with our video recording of this event, but John was kind enough to provide us with his presentation in PDF form (via Google Drive). Meeting Notes (Written notes from the 03/11/19 meeting by Valerie Paquin) John created this presentation because he has been a typographer for forty years, and an editor even longer than that. In 1978, John started publishing the Pacific Northwest Review of Books (a critical success and financial failure). He has edited several books about design and a book about Microsoft’s C fonts. Essentially, typography is all about space… and making sure the content is readable. Is serif easier to read than sans serif? It really depends on the font. Splitting typefaces into serif and sans serif is just one way of sorting them, and it’s not always the most useful — don’t make assumptions. Microsoft made Calibri (sans serif) the standard typeface in Word in 2007 to replace Times New Roman. It’s a beautiful type to read and it works, but it’s not serif. Calibri’s creator didn’t think Microsoft would like Calibri because it has rounded, soft ends, and he didn’t think that it would work onscreen, but everybody liked it. Times New Roman was created for the Times of London for use on newsprint. It doesn’t have much letter spacing because they were trying to fit the text in skinny columns. John does not recommend using Arial or Helvetica for anything (especially not on a business card with numerals). They just aren’t very legible. Line length (in words, not size) is the most important consideration for readability. Inconsistency of typefaces within a document or set of documents or from the same publisher (like an auction house) is a problem. You have to have the correct fonts installed on your machine or the spacing and line breaks won’t match what the client sees. (Especially in Adobe programs.)   Make sure that the typeface you’re using has all the features you need, such as special characters, real italics, real small caps, etc. OpenType fonts have made things a lot easier because you don’t need to have the expert package for additional characters. PopChar and other apps and font managers show you what characters each typeface includes. Not every typeface includes bold, italic, small caps — don’t assume they do. (Most types in Word these days do have them.) Use cap-height numerals only if you’re using all caps, not with lowercase or mixed-case letters. Small caps are not just smaller capital letters (that is the definition of “fake small caps”). Both small caps and all-caps need to be spaced a little more loosely than their default spacing. Mixed case (upper & lower case) does not. Small caps should be more loosely spaced than …